Resolve .local Through Nameserver With Netplan

When using netplan it is easy to force .local DNS requests to go to you nameservers instead of being only resolved locally (the default and standard).

This also works with all other strange .WHATEVER domains you may have lying around in your organization.

Snippet from netplan configuration:

 nameservers:
        addresses:
          - X
          - Y
        search:
          - local
          - myotherstupiddomain

MongoDB Logrotate

MongoDB does not rotate it’s log on it’s own. To get it to ratet we will use logrotate. First, we need to configure some things in mongod.conf to get the desired behaviour when we utilize logrotate. systemLog:destination:filepath:/var/log/mongodb/mongod.loglogAppend:truelogRotate:reopenAfterwards, we can create a logroatet configuration going in /etc/logrotate.d/mongodb. /var/log/mongodb/mongod.log { rotate 5 # Keep the last 5 rotated logs, so 6 files including the currently active size 10M # Rotate once the log reaches 10MB in size, depending on your envrionment you could instead use daily, weekly, monthly, etc missingok # It's ok if the log file does not exist create 0600 mongodb mongodb # Permissions and ownership for the roatetd logs delaycompress # Don't compress on first rotation, so we have the current log and log. [Read More]

DNS Resolution Everywhere

Usually at leas one of those is present on any system dig nslookup host But sometimes the usual suspects don’t work, especially in container-land. After trying them you may try some more involved/unknown things: getent Part of glibc, this will probably work on nearly every system. getent hosts example.org Or, if you specifically want to query A or AAAA records. getent ahostsv4 example.org getent ahostsv6 example.org Using Python2 Or Python3 Given this depends on glibc it is more of a alternative than another real solution [Read More]

How SELinux screws with scripts when run over VMware Tools

SELinux by default prohibits certain things from working through VMware tools (Ansible connection or plain API). This can be solved two ways: Disabling SELinux: BAD, but easy Writing a custom SELinux policy: complicated but more secure Note: Adding/Changing this policy through a VMware tools connection is thankfully possible Example policy This policy is the base for a VMware tools policy and allows entering the rpm context (yum). module custom-vmtools 1. [Read More]